We thought you might be interested in a simple step to help move a bill that will help increase residential and commercial tree canopy throughout VA, in the name of water quality improvement and flood mitigation.

From Tanner:

Delegate Keam’s proposed tree canopy Bill HB 2333 is something we have been looking forward to for some time.

View Bill HB 2333 here.

Why is the legislation needed?
Virginia state code currently limits the amount of canopy a locality may require a developer to plant/replace/preserve.

For example, under current law, for a residential parcel zoned for 10 or fewer units per acre, the locality may not require a tree canopy greater than 20% in 20 years’ time. For a commercial parcel, the maximum tree canopy a locality can require is 10%. That’s right, there is a maximum amount of trees a locality can require to be replaced.

What does HB 2333 do?
It exempts a locality from those caps if they’re using trees to achieve a water quality (i.e. Bay TMDL) or quantity (i.e. flood mitigation) goal.

See this attachment to see how it changes to existing law. (2pg PDF)

What can you do to support this common-sense legislation?
Simple. We are building a consortium of groups to add their names to our sign-on letter of support (see below how to join).

We will share this list with members of the House Counties, Cities and Towns subcommittee to ensure it makes its way to full committee vote.

From there we think it has a good chance of making it to the floor.

To join the sign-on letter all we need is:
Organization, Lead Signatory, and Title. You can see who else is already on board and add your organization to our running list here.

Or just email Tanner at CBF & let me know you are in!

View letter that will be sent that will include list of supporting organizations.

Have capacity to help?
Share this email with others who might be interested — HOAs, civic leagues, local government, tree stewards, healthcare companies, nurseries, tree care companies, botanical gardens, small and large businesses – anyone that has a stake in increasing tree canopy in the Bay watershed.

What is the deadline for signing?
We’ll leave the letter open until the bill is on the House Counties, Cities and Towns subcommittee #2 docket, which could be as early as next Thursday.

Thanks for your consideration. We hope you will join us. Please don’t hesitate to call if I can answer any questions about the bill.

Cheers,

Tanner Council
Hampton Roads Grassroots Manager
Chesapeake Bay Foundation
Brock Environmental Center | 757.644.4113

How to germinate live oak acorns

Harvest live oak acorns in the fall!

1) Gather off the ground.
Can pick off trees if turning brown and they easily pop out.

2) Float test.
Put acorns in a bucket or bowl of water.
Sink good. Float bad.

3) Heat treat to kill weevil larva.
Put acorns in a warm bath of water 115F-118F degrees not to exceed 120F or you kill the plant.
Weevils will float out and die after about 10-15 mins.

4) Plant trees in ground or pots.
No deeper than 2 times the thickness of the acorn.

5) Protect from squirrels.

6) Nurture them & watch them grow!

How to Measure a Big Tree

Check out the Virginia Big Tree Program.

The Virginia Big Tree Program began as a 4-H and FFA project in 1970. Today the program is coordinated by the Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation at Virginia Tech. We are a passionate community of tree enthusiasts . . .

Big Tree Measuring & Scoring link.

Trees are ranked in the Virginia Big Tree Register using a scoring system that is based on measurements of their physical dimensions . . . basic tools needed to measure a tree are a yardstick and a 100’ measuring tape.

i-Tree is a state-of-the-art, peer-reviewed software suite from the USDA Forest Service that provides urban and rural forestry analysis and benefits assessment tools.

Check out all the amazing tools available at iTreesTools.org!

Since the initial release of the i-Tree Tools in August 2006, thousands of communities, non-profit organizations, consultants, volunteers and students around the world have used i-Tree to report on individual trees, parcels, neighborhoods, cities, and even entire states. By understanding the local, tangible ecosystem services that trees provide, i-Tree users can link forest management activities with environmental quality and community livability.

Site includes an amazing tool that calculates a whole bunch of things about the benefits of 1 tree or all the trees at your home. Check out the MyTree app here.

Here’s just some of the apps available at iTreeTools:

    i-Tree Eco
    i-Tree Landscape
    i-Tree Hydro
    i-Tree Design
    i-Tree Canopy
    i-Tree Species
    i-Tree MyTree
    i-Tree Database
    i-tree Streets
    i-Tree Vue

    Plus a collection of Utility Programs like i-Tree Pest Detection Module & i-Tree Storm.

There’s even video learning, manuals and workbooks available too.

Have fun checking out this amazing website which includes a rich collection of i-Tree Resources too!